Abisko

The National Park has attracted hikers from all over the world for more than a century. Here begins the famous ”Kungsleden” and here is where you have the best chance of seeing the Northern Lights. If the Swedish mountains had its own capital, it would surely be Abisko.

Arjeplog

In between the great lakes of Uddjaure and Hornavan, along route 95, often referred to as The Silver Road, you find Arjeplog. It has the fewest citizens of all Norrbotten municipalities, but its fascinating Silver Museum attracts visitors from far far away.

Arvidsjaur

Smack in the middle of Lapland, some 100 kilometers south of the poor circle, you’ll find the village of Arvidsjaur. Known for pretty much nothing, loved for all that makes us love the north: the woods, the mountains, the light.

Bergglim

A narrow tear in the rock or a thin layer of soil on a cliff is all this little white and vigorous carnation Bergglim needs to shine as small spotlights against gray granite.

Bláhnage

There has long been a debate on Blattnicksele/Blattniksele in Sorsele municipality whether it should be spelled with or without the letter ”c”. To avoid trouble, we go with the the Ume-Saami name – Bláhnage.

Burträsk

When you pass an oversized cheese slicer along the E4 in Västerbotten’s coastal land, you know that you’ve ended up right. There is only one place on earth where the Västerbotten cheese can be made. Right here, in Burträsk.

Dorotea

”The air itself breathes serenity and calmness”, reads one of the lines in the Dorotea song. A spot on description of the village along the highway 45. Dorotea was named after queen Fredrika Dorotea Vilhelmina but we kind of prefer the Dorotea nickname: The south entrance to Lapland.

Eljest

To be a little different, of a certain kind, a bit special and not like the rest, peculiar but loveable, odd but pleasant, strange but in an appealing way. All of this is to be what we in the north of Sweden call eljest.

Fara

In Standard Swedish, the word ”fara” is used solely when someone makes an extended trip. You can, for example, ”fara” to Australia. In the north, however, you use ”fara” for any kind of trip, whether it’s to the mountains, to the office or your next-door neighbor.

Fredrika

The limit for defining itself as an urban location goes to a crowd of 200 people. Fredrika in Åsele municipality lost that status in 2015. Still, the village is well worthy pf its place on the map, not least thanks to its stately and unexpected Buddha statue.

Haparanda

Sweden feels bigger when there are places with names that doesn’t even sound Swedish. Haparanda, stunningly located right on the Finnish border is one of those places.

He

In Swedish, there are many different words used to cover all meaning of the English verb ”put”. In the North, there is one short word that fulfills the same inclusive function as ”put”: He.

Holmnäs

The best thing about Norrland is the unpredictability. Like when fine culture moves into a sheep house. In the small village of Holmnäs outside Umeå, a well-attended opera performance is held once a year in the sheep house where the acoustics send a libretto echoing far over the meadows in the bright summer night.

Hössjö

A late summer 1853, Johan Natanaelsson, Hössjö, was executed for with intent having murdered his father-in-law. Johan became the last person in Västerbotten to be sentenced to death. Incidentally, Hössjö, south of Umeå, is a fairly quiet community.

Jokkmokk

For many, Jokkmokk is most associated with the annual market and with Bengt Djupbäck, which the singer Jokkmokk-Jocke was really called. For others, Jokkmokk is the obvious center for Sami from all over Sapmi.

Jukkasjärvi

Its sami-name, Cohkkiras, means meeting place. Funny, given that Jukkasjärvi initially was just the priset and the sexton. But today, this is indeed a place where people do meet from all over the world. At the Ice Hotel.

Kiruna

One of the world’s largest cities, one of the most remote, one of the most mythical. From deepest mine to highest mountain, through space research and reindeers – yes, all roads should lead to Kiruna.

Krycklan

For those who know their hydrology and aquatic ecology, Krycklan is home turf. All others can be well informed about this still watercourse in the Vindelälven river, which, along a part of the route, also has a nature reserve named after it.

Lappspira

It gets just over two inches high. It looks a little special with its asymmetrical yellow-white flowers. It spreads throughout the Swedish mountains but blooms only during late summer. But the sweet scent of Lappspiran remains.

Ljusvattnet

Along the slowest part of the E4, between Umeå and Skellefteå, you pass the seemingly insignificant village with the self-explanatory name Ljusvattnet. Crystal clear lakes, summer and winter.

Lovikka

A mitten, knitted with yarn and with a significant cross pattern, was all it took for a small village far north of the Arctic Circle to make a name for itself in wide circles. But then again, those mittens are something else.

Malgomaj

The big lake outside Vilhelmina, where every year someone seems to be breaking the biggest char-record, has a name that sounds very much like a Swedish toddler trying to speak English.

Nalta

Nalta means little. In Vänsterbotten, there is a proverb laconically clarifying how nalta is best used: Harta borti harta jer brano, harta borti he, he jer nalta. (You may want to Google it, or better still, ask someone from Västerbotten).

Nanting

It’s commonly claimed that people in the north of Sweden are quiet. But when it comes to expletives, they do speak quite freely. And they use their profanities in a creative way, more often than not to emphasize how amazing something is: ”Nanting (Oh my God!) these frames are stunning!”

Nattviol

You will feel its scent before it catches your eye. Nattviol (Platanthera Bifolia), commonly known in English as the Lesser Butterfly Orchid, occurs most frequently in early summer, thrives best in moist soil, likes growing in groups and grows fastest at night – hence the beautiful name in Swedish - Nattviol (Night Violet).