Åheden

Where Stockholm has its Dalarö, Gothenburg its Marstrand and Helsingborg its Viken, Umeå in Åheden has its very own refuge for city dwellers who want to breathe the cleanest air and live the simplest life.

Burträsk

When you pass an oversized cheese slicer along the E4 in Västerbotten’s coastal land, you know that you’ve ended up right. There is only one place on earth where the Västerbotten cheese can be made. Right here, in Burträsk.

Church Town

Over 400 years after they were first built by farmers who needed somewhere to spend the night in connection with Sunday’s church visit, 405 cottages still remain. Since 1996, Gammelstad Church Town in Luleå has enjoyed a place on UNESCO’s World Heritage List.

Fara

In Standard Swedish, the word ”fara” is used solely when someone makes an extended trip. You can, for example, ”fara” to Australia. In the north, however, you use ”fara” for any kind of trip, whether it’s to the mountains, to the office or your next-door neighbor.

Fjällspira

It was first discovered back in 1737. Ever since, the tiny pink flowers with the white and wooly stalk has fascinated early summer hikers. Need we say the Fjällspira can only be found in the very northern parts of Sweden?

Fredrika

The limit for defining itself as an urban location goes to a crowd of 200 people. Fredrika in Åsele municipality lost that status in 2015. Still, the village is well worthy pf its place on the map, not least thanks to its stately and unexpected Buddha statue.

Ids

People of the North generally do not care all the much whether the grammar is one hundred percent adequate or whether the one you’re in dialogue with is slightly offended. If you don’t feel like doing something, you let them now by bluntly saying so: ”jag ids int” (I cannot be bothered).

Nordanskär

Who doesn’t want to check in at a ”kurort” (health resort) at any time in their lives? This beautiful Swedish word that rings so much more holistic well-being than the more contemporary spa. The outlet of the island Nordanskär in the Kalix River was already in the 19th century Sweden’s, and perhaps the world’s most northerly kurort.

Ogjort

What’s northern Swedish for unplugged? ”Oi” (literally meaning ”not in”, referring to the cord). That’s just how efficient they use the language. Instead of using opposite words, simply add ”un” (”o”) as often as you can. If this copy was not yet written, it would remain ”ogjord”

Ramsan

We’ll eat, you’ll cook. So it goes, the chant (ramsa, in Swedish) that is taught to Swedish children in school to remember the names and order of rivers in Halland. To remember the name of the dark water that forms a tributary to the Umeå River, no need to chant. It’s called, in short, Ramsan (”The Chant”).

Sidensjö

Örnsköldsvik and its surroundings is sometimes referred to as ”Foppaland”, named after the hockey player Peter Forsberg. Just where the borders to this land sits is hard to tell. Sidensjö, the beautiful village located between two lakes, is 20 km from Örnsköldsvik. Just offside Foppaland, probably.

Siksele

In the summertime, the view of the Vindel River is what makes Siksele one of the most stunning places in the Norrland countryside. In the wintertime, the same river is covered with ice and non-profit forces in the village maintain a winter road over the river. Simply because it can be done.

Vars

Where in Sweden you are from, decides how you use the word ”where”. In Standard Swedish, there are two different ways of using the word: ”var” and ”vart”. In the North, the, to amusement for people in southern Sweden, the Swedish language is less refined. Here, they simply replace ”var” and ”vart” with ”vars”, which covers covers both meanings.